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 Post subject: Fuel Gauge
PostPosted: Wed Mar 09, 2005 17:08 
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Joined: Wed Mar 09, 2005 17:03
Posts: 7
Location: Huntington, WV
Does anyone have a suggestion on where to get a replacement fuel gauge for my '47 Chief. I bought it in October and it is due for an annual this month and I just KNOW that I'll get a "squawk" about it. I ordered a "aeronca type" POS from aircraft spruce, but it jsut looks like the one that's in there now. (It works about as well, too)

TIA,

Ed


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PostPosted: Wed Mar 09, 2005 21:26 
Try OBSOLETE FORD PARTS, Inc., 8701 S. Interstate 35, Oklahoma City,
OK. Zip 73149. 1-405-631-3933. Yep, it's a Model A Ford gas gauge.
The info I've given you is a bit dated. Best of luck.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Mar 10, 2005 08:40 
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Joined: Tue Nov 16, 2004 22:22
Posts: 2407
Location: Danville, KY (DVK)
Lowell's got a good idea. But if that doesn't work, you can try Wag-Aero. They sell a complete unit, that I believe is exact same part, but it's not certified. Be that as it may, who would know the difference. :oops: If you only need to fix or repair it, Wag also has a rebuild kit, with the glass, seal, float, and some other tid bits.

more ideas.

nkh

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7AC-5691
Super 85-12F @ DVK


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Sep 29, 2007 17:48 
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Joined: Tue Sep 04, 2007 07:25
Posts: 218
Location: Payson, AZ
I am having a problem removing the the old gauge from the tank from a 7AC. I have included two pictures. Having read that the gauge is a Model A Ford gauge, I ordered the tools. In the meantime I found someone with the tools. I took the tank to him and he said it isn't a Model A gauge.

The outer nut is fiber and is breaking apart. I have applied Kroil to it without thinking. I bet the fiber has soaked the oil up and has swollen and is now even harder to remove.

What do you think and what are my options?

Image

Image

Regards

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1947 7AC Champ
N3621E, 7AC-6950
Cont C-85-12F
Restoring


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 Post subject: Champ fuel Gage
PostPosted: Sat Sep 29, 2007 18:37 
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Joined: Sun Jul 09, 2006 14:08
Posts: 312
Hi Robert, the gage in my Champ is not a Ford Model A gage either, but a Model A gage will fit and work, you may have to do some minor mods like bending the float wire to the right length. I don't don't have the fuselage tank so I can't help you with how to get it just right.
Heres a great place to get Model A gage parts and gages if needed.
http://www.snydersantiqueauto.com/modelaparts/GasGauge

The Model A outer nut will fit your gage or as I said the model A gage will fit the tank if you want to go with new.

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GB MN.Flyer
Flying a Champ 7DC and a HKS Kitfox III


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Sep 29, 2007 21:11 
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Joined: Tue Sep 04, 2007 07:25
Posts: 218
Location: Payson, AZ
Thanks for the info. I do have a Model A gauge on order. I will continue working to remove the old one. Maybe someone else will have an idea on how to remove it.

Regards

Robert

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1947 7AC Champ
N3621E, 7AC-6950
Cont C-85-12F
Restoring


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Sep 30, 2007 09:05 
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Joined: Wed Nov 17, 2004 11:47
Posts: 597
Location: Kewanee, IL. (EZI)
Snyders has the chrome hex outer nut as well. Paul Gould has a supplier for the outer nuts (knurled) that was used for the geared gauge. Aeronca used both types of gauges.

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Blue Skies and Stay Safe, and preserve 'em


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Sep 30, 2007 09:39 
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Joined: Tue Sep 04, 2007 07:25
Posts: 218
Location: Payson, AZ
Jody Wittmeyer wrote:
Snyders has the chrome hex outer nut as well. Paul Gould has a supplier for the outer nuts (knurled) that was used for the geared gauge. Aeronca used both types of gauges.


I ordered mine from Mike's "A" Ford-Able and it is the chrome hex outer nut as well. I hope I can remove the old one without doing damage to the tank.

Regards

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1947 7AC Champ
N3621E, 7AC-6950
Cont C-85-12F
Restoring


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Jan 19, 2008 15:32 
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Joined: Wed Dec 22, 2004 19:09
Posts: 220
Location: 47A and JZP
I ordered mine from Mike's "A" Ford-Able and it is the chrome hex outer nut as well. I hope I can remove the old one without doing damage to the tank.

Regards[/quote]

Ol' Mike Butcher is a great guy, you probably talked to his daughter or wife, when you ordered it. Did ya tell him that you were orderin' it fer an airplane? They'da got a kick out of it!:D

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Shorty


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Jan 19, 2008 16:15 
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Joined: Wed Nov 17, 2004 11:47
Posts: 597
Location: Kewanee, IL. (EZI)
    A lot of talk has been generated about our poor, inaccurate model "A" fuel gauges. I have found them to be very reliable, but it takes some work to get them there. The gauge on my Champ plagued me for a year, before I finally got the problems fixed. It has been very reliable and fairly accurate for the past four years. (900 hours of flying)
    Probably the biggest complaint, or concern, is leakage of the gauge, whether a nose tank, or especially the auxiliary tanks in the Chiefs.
    Several outfits stock the replacement parts. I have enclosed a photo of the parts supplied by Snyder’s Antique Auto Parts. (Photo 1)This particular kit comes with a new varnished cork float, complete gasket set, the brass bushing that goes in the float and the brass washer that keeps the float from coming off the rod. I will provide links and part numbers at the end of this article.


    First, I should explain the removal of the gauge. To remove the gauge from our nose tanks, takes a large open end or crescent wrench. Don’t hold me to this, but I believe the hex size is 1 ¼ inch. I use the crescent wrench, so I am not positive. There is a special wrench for the knurled ring on the Chief Aux. tank, or a strap wrench can be used. I have seen many destroyed by using pliers. If you warp the ring on these, they never will seal right! Paul Gould, from Sardinia, Ohio, has someone that makes these rings for him. They are pricey, though.
    Using the correct tool, remove the large hex nut, which is the outer ring of the gauge. Then, carefully pull the whole assembly from the tank. It all comes out the hole on top of the panel. You have to get the right twist/turn to get the float out. Be gentle!
    Next, there is a special tool to remove the glass that covers the indicator. I
    made mine from a piece of 3/4 inch square bar stock. Carefully unscrew the plug, then remove the metal piece with the indicator alignment marks (- -), the gaskets and the glass. The original glass viewer has a raised oval that protrudes into the oval slot in the metal piece. If the glass is still clear, or can be cleaned up, keep it and reuse it. Some turn yellow and cloudy and won’t clean up. The kit comes with new, clear glass, but it is flat. If you noticed when you removed the metal piece that covers the glass, there is a tab on one side. There is a hole on the top and bottom of the housing that the tab gets inserted into. Locate them so you know where they are at. When it comes time to reassemble the gauge, the metal piece will have to be inserted on an angle, tab end first. When you get the tab into the hole, the rest of it will almost fall into place.
    Now look at the float rod, where it connects to the rocker. I have a pen pointing to it in the photo. (Photo 2)







    Grab the rod and the gauge and twist, to see if there is any movement at all. If there is, you need to secure it. This is just pot metal, so use what works, but make sure it is fuel proof. I used J.B. Weld. You probably noticed the float is perpendicular to the gauge. If the rod is not tight in the gauge, when you fill up, the float rises, but the rod turns in the gauge instead of moving the gauge to read full. What is worse, it won’t read accurate when you are empty.
    Check your float. You may not need to replace it if it looks good. If you don’t replace it, check the shellac coating. Now is the time to redo it. Shellac has worked well for years, but if you get any auto gas that has alcohol in it, it will eat the shellac right off. If your cork gets gas soaked it won’t be accurate. You have a couple of options here. Change to a brass float or an automotive type of plastic float, re shellac (at least 3 coats) or use epoxy varnish on the cork. This system seems indestructible. Make sure the float is completely dried out before you seal it. A plastic float is available from Snyders.
    Now we reassemble the gauge. Locate the two small cork gaskets in the kit. Place a gasket inside the housing, then the glass, metal plate (don’t forget, tab first), the other cork gasket and finally the retainer nut. Snug the nut down, but don’t over tighten. With the metal pressing directly on the glass, over tightening can crack or break the glass. Don’t ask how I know this!

    Before we go any further, it’s time to calibrate the gauge. Put the tail up and level the wings. Drain the fuel tank that you are working on. Once drained, carefully install the fuel gauge in the tank, without the gaskets. Rotate the gauge with your hand, so the indicator reads straight up and down, not crooked. Hold the gauge in place with your hand and observe the reading. The “0” or empty should be centered in the viewer. I did this with one gallon (measured) in the tank. I didn’t want it to be empty when I saw the zero appear. Remove and bend the gauge until you get the zero centered. That’s the important reading. When you have accomplished this, remove the gauge. Slip the large cork gasket over the float. I put a little hyplomar gasket material on it, just to hold it to the back side of the gauge, so it won’t fall off.
    The gasket is smaller than the rocker that has the readings on it, so you have to slip one side over the rocker, move the rocker to the other side and seat the rest of the gasket. There is a grove on the back side of the gauge, where the gasket is supposed to set, so make sure it is centered. Re-insert the gauge assembly into the tank. Locate the copper gasket and put it on the gauge, then the hex nut. Align the gauge again, so the numbers are vertical and tighten the nut.
    With a measured can, put 1 gallon of fuel at a time in the tank, observing and logging the readings after each gallon, until the tank is full. On my champ, (13gallons) at ¾ it takes @ 3 gallons, ½ @ 6 gallons, ¼ @ 9 gallons and @ 11 ½ gallons on 0. Remember, I zeroed with some fuel in the tank.
    Lower the tail and check for leaks. In three point attitude and full tank, the fuel is a little higher than the gauge and leaks will show up.
    Well hopefully, this will cure your gauge woes. Mine has worked flawlessly for over 900 hours now.
    http://www.classicautoparts.com
    http://www.snydersantiqueauto.com
    Part Numbers
    Gauge Assembly (Complete) #A9312
    Rebuild Kit #A-9320-s
    Cork Float # A-9312-c
    Modern Float #A-9313-c
    Tool Set #A-9300
    Gasket Set #A-9321/23 (cork)
    #A-9321/23n (neoprene)
    Glass Lens #A-9323
    Face Plate #A-9325
    Inner Nut #A-9326
    Outer Nut # A-9330

    This article written by Jody Wittmeyer for the National Aeronca Association. Not to be copied, forwarded or reprinted without permission from the author!





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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Jan 19, 2008 16:38 
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Joined: Wed Nov 17, 2004 11:47
Posts: 597
Location: Kewanee, IL. (EZI)
Sorry, the photo's didn;t come up. This does notapply to the geared gauge, that are held in place by the fiber, or metal ring as showed in the previous post. only the gauges held in place with the outer hex nut. The gauges are interchangeable, but only as a complete unit, including the outer ring or nut. I will work on getting the photo's, or I can email the article in a word document and it will have photo's. Paul Gould, from Sardina, OH has some rings that would replace your broken fiber ring. I have some glass lenses and maybe some gaskets left.
You can buy a new model "A" guage, complete, to replace this unit. Make sure to get the hex nut also.

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