Emergency Procedures for Attempting Engine Restart

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yiasou
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Emergency Procedures for Attempting Engine Restart

Post by yiasou » Wed May 27, 2009 11:08

I am interested in hearing from owners who have had experience with engine failures inflight and what procedures (if any, other than landing) can be used to attempt to restart the engine.

Much thanks, George

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skyking3286
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Post by skyking3286 » Wed May 27, 2009 11:32

The rule of thumb I've heard is that if you have good compression on the engine, you can't really expect to restart the plane. People have gone all the way to Vne and only had one blade move, losing a thousand or two feet of altitude in the meantime.

So the rule is this: If the engine quits, the insurance company now owns the airplane. Do what you can do to save yourself.
Mark Peterson
Harvey Field, WA
A copy of my old Chief website is preserved here:

http://www.reocities.com/mrpeters.geo/index.html

yiasou
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Post by yiasou » Wed May 27, 2009 11:56

Mark,

Well put.

I guess a McDowell starter would be helpful. At least I could be cranking on it while initiating a forced landing procedure.

Of course the key (I assume) is outstanding maintenance. I wonder what the statistics are on problems with the A65 or other Continental engines. I would imagine very low.

Safe flying.

George

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Post by MikeB » Wed May 27, 2009 13:11

George,
Generally speaking the A65's are pretty bulletproof although good maintenance is the key. The usual 'engine failure' is running out of fuel due to a somewhat limited fuel capacity. Two hours is my personal minimum in my Champ with a 13 gallon capacity assuming about 4.5 gallons per hour which is figured on the high side...probably closer to 4.0 gph.

Mike Berg

yiasou
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Post by yiasou » Wed May 27, 2009 14:11

Mike,
That's good to hear. I am guessing that 2 hrs. is about my limit before I'll need to take a break anyway.
George

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Post by MikeB » Wed May 27, 2009 15:25

I guess the word would better be 'personal maximum' (time) rather than minimum. There's always the unknown: i.e. airport with no fuel, weather, headwinds, not to mention the 'overloaded bladder' :roll: . I had around 1 1/2 hours when I was flying into Oshkosh last year but opted to stop at Wautoma and fuel up rather than get stuck in the 'merry go-round' on approach and run out of fuel.
Cheers!
Mike

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SFC Hiatt
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Post by SFC Hiatt » Wed May 27, 2009 18:53

I know a guy.............who spent 6,000 feet trying to make a Chief restart with no luck. However, it was very good experience learning how to streach her out. I would recommend staying over the airport and remembering to stay upwind. Without an engine a little wind becomes a lot of wind very quickly.

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Tim Juhl
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restart

Post by Tim Juhl » Wed May 27, 2009 21:59

My understanding is that a metal prop is more likely to keep windmilling than a wooden one. If the prop stops, there is little that you can do to get a restart.

Cub pilots have it a little bit easier because the door can be opened in flight.



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Tim
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joea
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Post by joea » Wed May 27, 2009 22:30

Have to say that I have never (knock on wood) had a small Continental "go South" on me so far and this is after flying them on and off for 37 years.

Personally I would not put a McDowell on an aircraft for use as a "in-flight starter" but would use it on the ground. Usually up in the air you are a bit busy (or should be) fussing with other things than yanking a cable operated starter.

Joe A

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Post by Captgrumps » Thu May 28, 2009 00:37

Cranking a 65hp engine in the air is beyond me--if it quits it is usually because the pilot screwed up or you have a mechanical. Then you hopefully use what your instructor taught you about emergency, off airport landings. Cranking a McDowell starter while flying with the other hand and analyzing what went wrong doesn't make for good proceedure. If I was that concerned I would put on a C85-12 engine and install a starter and battery. I haven't tried in air propping yet. Too old to try it. :roll:

Doug
Keep the pointed end forward--
The dirty side down.....
And the blue skies on top....

yiasou
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Starter

Post by yiasou » Thu May 28, 2009 17:50

Hey Guys - thanks for all of the input. I appreciate your taking the time to reply in detail. Best, George

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Post by Holcombe » Wed Jun 03, 2009 11:29

I have an aluminium prop, and have no desire to ever let it stop turning in flight, but I understood you have to do a full stall, stop in flight to get it to stop windmilling, which will let you glide further.
Tail winds are a "Good Thing"

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marklamon
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Post by marklamon » Wed Jun 03, 2009 23:31

I stopped my aluminum prop in the air last summer (not proud of it, but I just had to know). It did take almost a full stall to make it stop. and it started spinning again at about 110 MPH. My engine is a A-75 that had about 50 hours on it. I am guessing that if the engine has more hours on it it would turn over sooner (less MPH) .

I did notice increased glide (less drag) when the prop was stopped. After I found out when the prop stopped and started again, I decided to stop the prop once more and do a dead stick to the middle of the runway.

My personal thought is, six of one and a half dozen of another. The near stall results in altitude loss, more than likely the increased glide distance you gain by stopping the prop is lost during the stall.

Bottom line, if the event with the engine is catastrophic enough to stop the prop in flight. I don't think you will get it going again even if you point her straight down. Mark

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